March 19, 2012

Our Runaway Youths: What Schools, Communities, and Parents Can Do To Protect LGBTQQ Children ~ The Sanctuary House

Posted in Proposals I have written tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 11:43 pm by greeneyezwinkin3@aol.com

I wrote this proposal for a class. My mother opened up the first runaway shelter in Pennsylvania. It was called, “The Sanctuary House ” I dedicate my proposal to her.

Memorandum

To: Executive Director, The Threshold Foundation

From: Danelle Wolfe, Proposal Writer

Date: 3/19/2010

Re: Memo on: Our Runaway Youths: What Schools, Communities, and

Parents can do to protect LGBTQQ children ~

The Sanctuary House Project

Good afternoon,

Homeless and runaway children were seldom reported but, have existed as part of our history since the early settlement of the United States. In 2009, there was an estimated one to three million runaway and homeless youths in Americaat any point in time. Some of the reasons are: emotional or physical abuse, problems in school or home and even feeling of not fitting in. Within this group are the LGBTQQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer and Questioning) individuals. Our society is based on the two gender concept and countless youths fall out side of the “norm.” As a result these children have experienced ridicule and discrimination possibly from friends and family resulting in running away or worse, taking their own life as they try to escape the hate and end up on the streets or dead. It is the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer, adolescents who are at a higher risk for abuse while living on the streets.

The Sanctuary House will represent a safe haven for those in need. The immediate goals for this preventive program are to save a child from living on the streets, give encouragement to be who they are, teach communication skills, and educate the community. It will be a twenty four, seven days a week shelter for teens in need of assistance with an open door policy. Once established in a secure setting these children ranging from ten to eighteen will be fed, housed, and counseled. The concept is to have communication reopened between a youth and their family. One long term goal is to reunite the family unit. The next stage would be to focus on establishing training for fifteen to eighteen year olds in connection with instituting employment opportunities within the community. The local Transportation Department working with the project, within a thirty mile radius is willing to create passes for the youths after establishing employment.

We as a team will participate in the construction, design and implementation of the project. I would like extra participation dealing with the context issues of the project. Many local businesses are willing to begin the process of contracting the necessary materials to begin work immediately. The planning proposal will be read by the internal staff members, decision makers within our organization and after approval it will be sent to Threshold Foundation: The Queer Youth Fund for a requested grant of $10,000.00 to begin the project. The research for the program will involve statistics on the suicide rate of the homeless youths as well as reviewing present programs similar to The Sanctuary House, and examining the high statistics of the LGBTQQ runaway youth problem of today. “One in every seven youth will run away from home by the age of 18 (The National Runaway Switchboard, 2001).” The statistics as of 2009 were clarified and reported as children between the ages of ten to eighteen run away.

Children whom reside in The Sanctuary House will attend school, live in a learning environment which will include weekly discussions on responsible and healthy behavioral activities that are necessary for personal relationships and daily family meetings with a child’s parents and/or other family members. Monthly speakers who are anticipating working with the project will discuss the trials and tribulations of the community through education of the current AIDS issues/other gender related problems, and incorporate community events for example, by participating in Pridefest. A local organization, Also Youth, has a drop-in center that will work with the project in referring adolescents in need of help. There will be four certified counselors (two female, two male) that will live on the premises alternating weekends with four part time counselors (two female, two male), also certified.

Something to keep in mind:

For every dollar invested in a child, there is a seven-dollar return for society…

(Annan, K., United Nations Secretary-General Address to the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Children, May 2001).

Thank you for taking the time to read this proposal.

Cordially,

T. Danelle Wolfe

Writer

Proposal Department

WAH!!!

We Are Here 1432 Hope Street

Sarasota Florida 54321

(PH) 555-987-6543

(FX) 555 -987-4321

Our Runaway Youths: What Schools, Communities, and Parents Can Do To Protect LGBTQQ Children ~ The Sanctuary House

 

Prepared for: The Threshold Foundation

Written by Danelle Wolfe

Planning Proposal

Date of application: 3/19/2010

Name of organization: Threshold Foundation

Purpose of grant: WAH will utilize The Queer Youth Fund’s resources towards the project of a housing organization geared towards the LGBTQQ’s (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning) runaway youths in our community.

Address of organization:PO Box 29903San Francisco,CA94129
Telephone number: (415) 561-6400

Contact person and title: Threshold Foundation, Director of Fundraising

Is your organization an IRS 501(c)(3) not-for-profit?(Yes or No):Yes

Grant request: $10,000.00

Check one: General support: N/A Project support: X

Dates covered by project budget (mo/day/year): April 2010 – March 2011

Project name: Our Runaway Youths: What Schools, Communities, and Parents can do to protect LGBTQQ children ~

The Sanctuary House Project

Table Of Contents


Executive Summary……………………………………………………1

Project Description I……………………………………………………2

Project Goals and Objectives……………………………………..…….3

Plan for Measuring Results……………………………………………..12

Budget Analysis…………………………………………………………13

Conclusion: The Success of The Sanctuary House…………………….14

Executive Summary

Snapshot of WAH

We Are Here Inc. (WAH), a non profit 501 (c)(3) organization has been part of theSarasotaFloridacommunity since 2007. Our creed is to shelter the homeless youths (10-18 years old) in the LGBTQQ community, feed, counsel, reunite families and/or and train them for employment purposes, and provide medical care. We respect their individual sexual identity/gender and support these adolescents providing a tangible connection to available community relief systems.

Organizational Statements

Our Vision Statement

WAH aspires to be a valuable source of social services committed to enhancing the life and personal dignity of LGBTQQ youth’s.

Mission Statement

Our mission is to offer community services intended to create a structured, compassionate, and safe atmosphere through which LGBTQQ youth and their families may obtain awareness, individual growth, encouragement, skills and personal success.

Organizational Name

We Are Here Incorporated

Legal Form of Business

The Sanctuary House will be a 501(c)3 not–for–profit organization.

I. PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Statement of need

Our society is based on the two gender concept and countless youths fall out side of the “norm” and as a result these children, the LGBTQQ youths have experienced ridicule and discrimination possibly from friends/family resulting in running away or worse, taking their own life as they try to escape the hate and end up on the streets or dead.

Homeless and runaway children were seldom reported but, have existed as part of our history since the early settlement of theUnited States. Presently, at this very minute, inFloridathere are 5,949 runaway youths that have been reported. In 2008, “The U.S Dept. of Health and Human Services estimates there was an estimated 1.6 to 2.8 million runaway and homeless youths in America at any point in time…Our analysis of the available research suggests that between 20 percent and 40 percent of all homeless youth identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). Given that between 3 percent and 5 percent of theU.S.population identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, it is clear that LGBT youth experience homelessness at a disproportionate rate.”

Some reasons given are:

Emotional or physical abuse

Problems in school or home

To be with others people who are supportive and

encouraging of sexual identity/gender

To be within places that are distractions from

their problems

Feeling of not fitting in

These young people have been classified as, “Policy Focal Runaways…defined as minors who, along with fitting the broad scope definition of runaways, are also endangered due to not having a familiar, safe place to stay.”

It is the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning adolescents who are at a higher risk for abuse while living on the streets. It is these reasons that Reed explained, “The psychological effects of victimization, rejection and social stigma, resulting in feelings of isolation, experience by many gay and lesbian youth constitute what Meyer (1995) terms as ‘minority stress’. It is because of this stress and isolation, that lesbian and gay youth are at increased risk for other factors such as anxiety and depression, academic problems, substance abuse problems, sexual abuse, running away, homelessness and prostitution, HIV infection, and suicide. Identity development and family and peer rejection are the main contributing factors in isolating gay and lesbian youth.” In order to ensure suicide prevention, our organization will serve the LGBTQQ youths and will partner with theFlorida’s statewide suicide prevention agencies.

The Sanctuary House acknowledges the fact that our society is not perfect. It is crucial to study the negative aspects concerning this issue in order to better serve this community. “Travers and Paoletti (1999) conclude that an understanding of the effects of this social world is vital in understand the concerns, behaviors, and emotional needs of lesbian and gay youth. This understanding is paramount, in trying to help them avoid becoming street involved.”

We Are Here, Inc. (WAH) is requesting a grant for a preventive program to get youths off the streets, reinforce encouragement to be who they are, teach communication skills, offer training for employment, educate the community, and reunite families. Our mission statement guarantees the helping of hands up and not the helping of hand outs.

Project Goals and Objectives

Short Term Goals

Lao Tzu, a wise man, once stated, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” Our short term objectives are based on the immediate needs of the homeless youth. Whereas, the long term goals are to reunite families (if this is not plausible, because the adolescent is unwilling or the family circumstances is hazardous, foster care is an option), institute an employment program and incorporate community educational events. Through this project, as objectives are met, the confirmation of the success of the program will be certain. These are listed below.

Create a twenty four, seven days a week shelter for teens in need of assistance with an open door policy.

Develop a safe haven for those in need.

Provide food, donated clothing, shelter, medical assistance and toiletries.

Create and foster communication with family members, community members and academic members.

Provide counseling and educational materials.

Establish training for fifteen to eighteen year olds in connection with instituting employment opportunities within the community.

Implement training for all staff members to effectively serve LGBT youth

Create passes in a joint venture with the local Transportation Department working with the project: with in a thirty mile radius for the youths after establishing employment.

Phase One:A safe haven

It is imperative to get these juvenile’s off the streets and supply a safe environment in which to concentrate on dilemmas and solutions within the walls of The Sanctuary House. They need time to focus on their future goals rather than struggling daily on the streets.

March 1, 2009 we constructed a committee for implementing and approving initial decisions regarding the program and begin contacting local establishments requesting participation in the program. With this in mind, we have successfully entered into a joint venture with the City ofSarasotaas of July 2010 to lease the property seen above. The eighteen units are fully operational and are on 1.11 acres on Sarasota’s North Trail. Within the office area is a two bedroom unit where employees will reside. The project manager will reside on the premises within the eighteenth unit.

Supplies for Shelter Participating Business Donations Item of donation

Operations:

1. Cots or Sleeping MatsBerkeleySurplus Store Military Pads

2. Blankets/Linens Bed, bath & Beyond Blankets/Sheets

3. Bottled or Potable Water Culligan man Fresh Water/Containers

4. Medical Supplies SarasotaMemorialHospital Emergency Medical

5. Eating Utensils

6. Towels & Toiletries for

Occupants

7. Sanitation and Cleaning Walmart Cleaning Materials

Supplies

8. Cooking equipment

9. Communication Equip.

10. TDD Telephone

11.

12 Foods items 7-eleven Corporation Various Food Sysco Food Products

13. Cleaning Laundry/linens Clean Step Living USA Services

Additional Donors and Sponsors

SunTrust

Gamma Mu Foundation

Tides Foundation

Calamus Foundation

Cameresi Designs

GreaterSarasotaChamber of Commerce

SarasotaCountyGovernment

Sarasota County Department of Health

Comcast Cable

Phase Two:

The shelter is in need of minor renovations and the City has recommended splitting the cost that will begin on September 2010 and will be completed for the opening on February 1, 2011.

Provision of food

Whether it is one or fifty youths residing in the program each one will require three square three meals a day. The project will implement a communal effort philosophy in meal preparation with donated items from local businesses such as 7-eleven and grant funds. Local churches and temples have agreed to donate lunches for the employed youths.

Clothing for all

The conditions living on the street make it literally impossible to have clean clothes without holes. Arrangements have been confirmed with local businesses and charities such as Salvation Army and Good Will to donate clothing to the project on a bi-weekly basis.

Medical clearance

Every child who enters the program must pass medical clearance by an in-house qualified General Practitioner and a Registered nurse. They test for contagious diseases and review the physical well being of the adolescent youth.

Long Term Goals

Once a youth has had their basic needs tended to the next step is to place them into counseling. It is critical to find an explanation of their actions in order to help in the long term plan of reestablishing contact with their family members and/or establishing a new life. If a young person is fifteen or older, counseling is first and foremost then training for employment.

Phase Three:

During this stage, in October 2010 we will begin the hiring process and identify complications and solutions.

The need to talk

Each youth will receive counseling from a licensed psychologist. Counseling sessions will begin the day after a youth enters the program and will continue weekly. Upon participating in the project educational material is distributed and they are notified that certain topics will arise during discussion time.

Youths whom reside in The Sanctuary House will live in a learning environment which will include weekly discussions on responsible and healthy behavioral activities that are necessary for personal relationships and daily family meetings with a child’s parents and/or other family members.

Monthly speakers who are anticipating working with the project will discuss the trials and tribulations of the community through education of the current AIDS issues/other gender related problems, and incorporate community events for example, by participating in Pridefest.

A local organization, Also Youth, has a drop-in center that will work with the project in referring adolescents in need of help starting on July 1, 2011. There will be four certified counselors (two female, two male) that will live on the premises alternating weekends with four part time counselors (two female, two male), also certified.

Phase Four:

In December 2010, the coordinating committee will finalize the updates for the WAH website for the up and coming program of The Sanctuary House and begin preliminary meetings with the local school board. We will also participate with the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network’s (GLSEN) annual school climate report.

Education and Employment

We will implement a training program for all staff members to successfully serve the LGBTQQ adolescents in January 2011.

Adolescent youths will be required to immediately enroll in school within our designated site. It is crucial that a young person doesn’t lose any educational benefits due to their circumstances. The Schoolhouse Link Program will be a partnership between the The Sanctuary House theSarasota County School Board. The program serves as a liaison and provides services to help families and youth that are homeless and in transition. The program’s goal is to ensure that students in transition are able to enroll, attend and succeed in school. Schoolhouse Link supports each student by helping create educational stability and by removing any barriers limiting their success.[1]

At this stage, help will be given in preparing the older juveniles for employment. Daily general training will help in the transition from homeless to a confident employee resulting

[1] http://www.sarasota-ymca.org/socialServices/homelessYouthEducation.cfm

in an independent individual. The creating of the bus pass program which will be implemented as a joint venture with the local Transportation Department working with the project: within a thirty mile radius for the youths after establishing employment.

Working with local businesses, the planning proposal will help create the unity of community actions. These establishments will contract youths for entry level positions within their companies.

Phase Five:

We are all family

Annual Pridefest inSarasotais an occasion for the entire community to come together in acceptance. Not only will we have a booth promoting the program along with educational brochures but, our clientele will be on a waiting list to participate as volunteers.

Effects of Inaction

Consequences of inaction adversely affect the community in which we reside. Therefore, we can not sit by and watch our children jeopardize their lives. The LGBTQQ homeless adolescents have been reported at a greater risk of sexual exploitation when living on the streets compared to non-LGBTQQ individuals.[1] The psychological issues, the medical issues and even spiritual issues of

our youth will continue to debilitate before our very eyes as they continue to live on the streets. Alone they have no voice. Our agency is about giving them the chance to be heard, to be safe and to continue living without fear. “Each year, there are approximately 2 million homeless and runaway youths in theUnited States.” If we do nothing, these statistics will only increase again.


[1]Shannon Moriarty commented, “One study noted that of the youth engaging in survival sex, 48 percent reported exchanging sex for housing or food, 22 percent traded sex for drugs, and 82 percent traded sex for money. 40-60 percent of homeless youth have experienced physical abuse and 17-35 percent have experienced sexual abuse. These young people are much more vulnerable to survival sex, prostitution, and sexual exploitation.”

Timeline   
   

Submit Grant Proposal

April, 2010

Expected Grant

June, 2010

Joint Venture contract signed with Sarasota City Notification

 

July, 2010

Notification Of Construction Bid

August, 2010

Begin Construction

September, 2010

Hire Staff

October – December 2010

Finalize Updates for Web Site/School Board Meetings

December 2010

Training for Employees

January, 2010

Construction completed

February, 2011

Opening day

March, 2011

Prepare Results Report

March, 2011

Key Staff (Resumes are attached)

Who’s on Board: Ficticious name. I made them up.

Melissa Leonard, LCSW
The executive director and one of The Sanctuary House founders,Sharon has worked for the past 15 years with low-income families and youth around the issues of poverty, abuse and neglect, substance abuse, mental illness and homelessness.

Iris Jackson, MA, M.Div.
A former social worker and mental health counselor, Iris is a career coach and life planning consultant with Bell Investment Advisors, Inc. She is the former board president of the Berkeley Ecumenical Chaplaincy to the Homeless.

Marie Perez
Marie is the case manager and supervisor for The Sanctuary House.

Patrick Edwards, MSW
A writer, Patrick previously worked as a social worker with LGBTQQ homeless adults inNew York City.

Sarah Kaiser, MA
Photographer and long time volunteer with homeless youth in Sarasota, she is one of The Sanctuary House founders.

Teresa Pagano
As Youth Services Coordinator, Heather is helping to create New Generation: the Future is Now for Trans. Formerly a supervisor in the The Sanctuary House shelter, she has been volunteering and organizing in solidarity with historically neglected communities for 10 years.

Jennifer Baily
A teacher recently retired toBerkeley after 30 years of teaching around the world, she is a tutor in the local school system.

Kenneth Peoples
Kenneth is the shelter manager for The Sanctuary House. He serves in this position as a member of the Lutheran Volunteer Corps.

Peter Olson
A Youth Counselor for The Sanctuary House , Peter holds a Master’s degree in counseling gender psychology and has been working in the field since 2000. He has worked as a mental health rehabilitation specialist and provided therapy to elementary school children living in theSarasota area.

Terry Mathers
The volunteer coordinator for The Sanctuary House.

II. PLAN FOR MEASURING RESULTS

We will have continuous reporting of the effects of our program regarding clients, schools and the community.

Survey present programs similar to The Sanctuary House, local organizations

Examine the behavior patterns of the LGBTQQ runaway

Monthly meetings with local business owners, religious organizations, and school districts

Assessment of achievement scores and grade levels

Analyze the visits of family members, amount of incoming/outgoing calls by youths, and surveys completed by parent’s

Quarterly reporting of local organizations and schools involved in the project

Weekly interviews with the youth clientele

Bi-Weekly meeting of employees including surveys

“One in every seven youth will run away from home by the age of 18 (The National Runaway Switchboard, 2001).” The statistics as of 2009 were updated and reported as children between the ages of ten to eighteen run away.

Dissemination

The purpose of this program is to assist the LGBTQQ youth in becoming productive members of society while increasing public awareness of the crisis which is plaguing our children. By creating and developing The Sanctuary House children between the ages of ten to eighteen will have a choice in their life, to begin a new journey. The final product will be saving a life.

Additional Funding

We could not provide the services we do without foundations such as yours, private and public donor contributions to fund our programs. State, City and County provide what they can. Other resources are The Sarasota County commission which granted $30,000 in funding last year used for contract services. Many agencies formed the Project Initiate and established a prevention contract in which we are associated and we were granted $45,000. Within the past three years WAH has received tax payer funding in grants that were from $5,000 to $8,000 per grant.

Budget Analysis:

Expenses AMT
General Operating Support  
Salaries 35,000
Joint Venture Lease 8,000
medical supplies 5,000
Insurance & taxes 6,000
Consultants & professional fees 25,000
In-kind Contributions 4,100
Utilities 3,000
Depreciation 2,000
Food 20,000
Repairs 6,500
Interest 2,100
Advertising/printing 5,000
Misc Supplies 3,500
Construction 45,000
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSE $170,200
 
 

Budget Narrative

For every dollar invested in a child, there is a seven-dollar return for society. (Annan, K., United Nations Secretary-General Address to the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on Children, May 2001).

Conclusion: The Success of The Sanctuary House

Clearly, thirty five million dollars are given every year by the government to address the homeless youth dilemma, but few of these funds reach the LGBTQQ adolescent community. Most support is through private grants, donations and fund raising.

These young people are in dire need of support through means of family, community, academic resources and social service programs such as ours. As we address the emotional, physical and spiritual effects of our children living on the streets and the results come to light. We are fighting for the healthy development of these LGBTQQ youths within safe environments and we need your help.

References

Flowers, R.B. (2001). Runaway Kids and Teenage Prostitution : America’s Lost, Abandoned, and Sexually Exploited Children. Retrieved April 2, 2010, from http://site.ebrary.com.library.esc.edu/lib/empire/docDetail.action?docID=10004890&p00=teenage%20runaway

Meyer, I.H. (1995). Minority stress and mental health in gay men. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, (36), 38-56.

National Runaway Switchboard. (2010). Retrieved April 2, 2010, from http://www.nrscrisisline.org/

Podschun, G.D. (1993). Teen Peer Outreach-Street Work Project: HIV Prevention Education for Runaway and Homeless Youth. Public

Health Reports, (108) 2, 150-155. Retrieved March 30, 2010, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/4597319

Reed, M. (2009). : Issues and Social Stigmas which Cause Gay and Lesbian Youth to be at increased Risk for Becoming Street Involved. Retrieved March 31, 2010, from http://www.sfu.ca/pridehouse/documents/pridehouseappx3.pdf

Statistics – Runaway and Homeless Youth. (2010). Retrieved April 3, 2010, from http://1736familycrisiscenter.org/quotes1a2.htm

Travers, R., and Paoletti, D. (1999). The lesbian, gay & bisexual youth program (LGBYP): A model for common communities seeking to improve the quality of life for lesbian, gay & bisexual youth. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, (8) (i4) 293. Retrieved April 1, 2010, from http://www.questia.com/googleScholar.qst;jsessionid=L2ML3h 3CMWPpLdbpKB0JL2y62FQTSMDpJLj2dVypLzZjpq4xGjL2!-348092591!948790962?docId=5001896464

#1 in Commercial Real Estate Online. (2010). Retrieved April 2, 2010, from http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/14948076/2413-N-Tamiami-Trail-Sarasota-FL/

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